RV Type Pros & Cons

This checklist provides the pros and cons of the major recreational vehicle categories. Scroll down or click on the categories below to jump to that section:

Class A Motor Home Pro Con
check box Easy to drive on highway.
check box Spacious, open floor plans suitable for fulltimers.
check box Elevated driver position provides a good view of the road ahead.
check box Driving and living compartments are connected. No need to get out of the RV during stops. Living area accessible even while moving.
check box Most storage space of all RV types.
check box Can tow vehicle behind or support a carrying platform on hitch.
check box Most expensive of all RV types.
check box The RV Consumer Group rates Class A's as having more structural problems and safety issues in crashes, especially those with slides.
check box Larger models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces.
check box Driving compartment being part of the living space does not appeal to some people, feeling like they are always in a vehicle.
check box Most are too large to drive around town; alternate local transportation required.
check box Elevated driver position and width of the vehicle make it difficult to judge clearance on the right side.
check box Top clearance can be a problem under low branches and structures. Problem compounded if carrying items on roof such as canoes.
check box Requires large storage area when not in use.
Class B Motor Home Pro Con
check box Least expensive motorized RV to own and operate.
check box Easy to drive on highway and around town. This RV is constructed from a van, so it is just as easy to drive.
check box Driving and living compartments are connected. No need to get out of the RV during stops. Living area accessible even while moving.
check box It can be used as local transportation.
check box Can tow a small trailer or support a carrying platform on hitch.
check box Can be used as a second family car when not traveling.
check box Requires no special storage when not in use. Fits in standard driveway and lower models may fit in the garage.
check box Can reach less accessible camping sites that are too tight for large RV's.
check box Limited space practical only for short trips.
Class C Motor Home Pro Con
check box Easy to drive, similar to a large moving truck.
check box Driving and living compartments are connected. No need to get out of the RV during stops. Living area accessible even while moving.
check box The RV consumer Group generally considers the Class C a safer motor home than the Class A because of the cockpit construction.
check box Can tow vehicle behind or support a carrying platform on hitch.
check box Smaller windshield and curtain separating cockpit makes unit easier to heat and cool than a Class A.
check box Largest models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces.
check box Some models may be too large to drive around town; alternate local transportation may be required.
check box Requires large storage area when not in use.
check box Even the largest models may not satisfy the fulltimers' need for space.
Fifth Wheel Trailer Pro Con
check box Easier and safer to tow than travel trailers, but requires more caution and skill than motor homes.
check box Easier to back up than travel trailers.
check box Spacious, open floor plans suitable for fulltimers.
check box Provides more interior space per length foot than motor homes because it does not contain driving and engine compartments.
check box Most storage space of all trailer type RV's.
check box Tow vehicle doubles as local transportation.
check box Requires a truck with fifth wheel hitch in bed.
check box Large trailers require large, medium duty trucks.
check box Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
check box Generally cannot tow vehicle behind trailer.
check box Larger models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces
check box On tall models top clearance can be a problem under low branches and structures. Problem compounded if carrying items on roof such as canoes.
check box Most models require large storage area when not in use.
Travel Trailer Pro Con
check box Spacious, open floor plans suitable for a variety of uses, including snowbirding.
check box Provides more interior space per length foot than motor homes because it does not contain driving and engine compartments.
check box Tow vehicle doubles as local transportation.
check box Lower profile allows easier entry than a fifth wheel trailer.
check box Lower profile allows roof storage of items such as canoes, with less concern for top clearance.
check box Can be towed with a variety of vehicles fitted with a standard ball hitch and rated for the trailer weight.
check box Least stable on the road of all RV types. Requires the most skill to tow and back up.
check box Large trailers require large trucks.
check box Less storage than fifth wheel trailers because it lacks a raised section.
check box Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
check box Generally cannot tow vehicle behind trailer.
check box Larger models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces.
check box Larger models require large storage area when not in use.
Slide-In Truck Camper Pro Con
check box One of the least expensive RV's.
check box Mounts in the bed of most full size trucks with minimal modifications.
check box Easy to drive on highway and around town. This RV is attached to the bed of a truck, so it is just as easy to drive.
check box Truck doubles as local transportation.
check box Can tow a small trailer or support a carrying platform on hitch.
check box Truck can be used as a family or work vehicle when not traveling.
check box Requires no special storage when not in use. Fits in standard driveway or back yard.
check box Can reach less accessible camping sites that are too tight for large RV's. When attached to an off-road truck, it can reach camping sites that no other RV's can.
check box Road handling can be an issue when mounted on a truck with light suspension.
check box Limited space practical only for short trips.
check box Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
Pop-Up & Fold-Down Trailer Pro Con
check box One of the least expensive RV's.
check box Very light weight. Can be towed behind light vehicles such as small trucks, SUV's, vans, and large sedans.
check box Tow vehicle doubles as local transportation.
check box No concern for top clearance because trailer folds lower than the tow vehicle.
check box Requires no special storage when not in use. Fits in standard driveway or back yard.
check box Can reach less accessible camping sites that are too tight for large RV's.
check box Limited space practical only for very short trips.
check box Living area is closed up during transportation and is inaccessible even during rest stops.
check box Non-existent or limited insulation makes this type uncomfortable in cold weather.



Changin' Gears (http://ChanginGears.com)

Recreational vehicle information for RV camping and the RV lifestyle


See Also

Getting Started

RV Types Intro

RV Amenities

RV Manufacturers

RV Type Pros & Cons

This checklist provides the pros and cons of the major recreational vehicle categories. Scroll down or click on the categories below to jump to that section:

Class A Motor Home Pro Con
check box Easy to drive on highway.
check box Spacious, open floor plans suitable for fulltimers.
check box Elevated driver position provides a good view of the road ahead.
check box Driving and living compartments are connected. No need to get out of the RV during stops. Living area accessible even while moving.
check box Most storage space of all RV types.
check box Can tow vehicle behind or support a carrying platform on hitch.
check box Most expensive of all RV types.
check box The RV Consumer Group rates Class A's as having more structural problems and safety issues in crashes, especially those with slides.
check box Larger models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces.
check box Driving compartment being part of the living space does not appeal to some people, feeling like they are always in a vehicle.
check box Most are too large to drive around town; alternate local transportation required.
check box Elevated driver position and width of the vehicle make it difficult to judge clearance on the right side.
check box Top clearance can be a problem under low branches and structures. Problem compounded if carrying items on roof such as canoes.
check box Requires large storage area when not in use.
Class B Motor Home Pro Con
check box Least expensive motorized RV to own and operate.
check box Easy to drive on highway and around town. This RV is constructed from a van, so it is just as easy to drive.
check box Driving and living compartments are connected. No need to get out of the RV during stops. Living area accessible even while moving.
check box It can be used as local transportation.
check box Can tow a small trailer or support a carrying platform on hitch.
check box Can be used as a second family car when not traveling.
check box Requires no special storage when not in use. Fits in standard driveway and lower models may fit in the garage.
check box Can reach less accessible camping sites that are too tight for large RV's.
check box Limited space practical only for short trips.
Class C Motor Home Pro Con
check box Easy to drive, similar to a large moving truck.
check box Driving and living compartments are connected. No need to get out of the RV during stops. Living area accessible even while moving.
check box The RV consumer Group generally considers the Class C a safer motor home than the Class A because of the cockpit construction.
check box Can tow vehicle behind or support a carrying platform on hitch.
check box Smaller windshield and curtain separating cockpit makes unit easier to heat and cool than a Class A.
check box Largest models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces.
check box Some models may be too large to drive around town; alternate local transportation may be required.
check box Requires large storage area when not in use.
check box Even the largest models may not satisfy the fulltimers' need for space.
Fifth Wheel Trailer Pro Con
check box Easier and safer to tow than travel trailers, but requires more caution and skill than motor homes.
check box Easier to back up than travel trailers.
check box Spacious, open floor plans suitable for fulltimers.
check box Provides more interior space per length foot than motor homes because it does not contain driving and engine compartments.
check box Most storage space of all trailer type RV's.
check box Tow vehicle doubles as local transportation.
check box Requires a truck with fifth wheel hitch in bed.
check box Large trailers require large, medium duty trucks.
check box Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
check box Generally cannot tow vehicle behind trailer.
check box Larger models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces
check box On tall models top clearance can be a problem under low branches and structures. Problem compounded if carrying items on roof such as canoes.
check box Most models require large storage area when not in use.
Travel Trailer Pro Con
check box Spacious, open floor plans suitable for a variety of uses, including snowbirding.
check box Provides more interior space per length foot than motor homes because it does not contain driving and engine compartments.
check box Tow vehicle doubles as local transportation.
check box Lower profile allows easier entry than a fifth wheel trailer.
check box Lower profile allows roof storage of items such as canoes, with less concern for top clearance.
check box Can be towed with a variety of vehicles fitted with a standard ball hitch and rated for the trailer weight.
check box Least stable on the road of all RV types. Requires the most skill to tow and back up.
check box Large trailers require large trucks.
check box Less storage than fifth wheel trailers because it lacks a raised section.
check box Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
check box Generally cannot tow vehicle behind trailer.
check box Larger models can be difficult to maneuver in tight spaces.
check box Larger models require large storage area when not in use.
Slide-In Truck Camper Pro Con
check box One of the least expensive RV's.
check box Mounts in the bed of most full size trucks with minimal modifications.
check box Easy to drive on highway and around town. This RV is attached to the bed of a truck, so it is just as easy to drive.
check box Truck doubles as local transportation.
check box Can tow a small trailer or support a carrying platform on hitch.
check box Truck can be used as a family or work vehicle when not traveling.
check box Requires no special storage when not in use. Fits in standard driveway or back yard.
check box Can reach less accessible camping sites that are too tight for large RV's. When attached to an off-road truck, it can reach camping sites that no other RV's can.
check box Road handling can be an issue when mounted on a truck with light suspension.
check box Limited space practical only for short trips.
check box Driving and living compartments are separate. Living area inaccessible while moving.
Pop-Up & Fold-Down Trailer Pro Con
check box One of the least expensive RV's.
check box Very light weight. Can be towed behind light vehicles such as small trucks, SUV's, vans, and large sedans.
check box Tow vehicle doubles as local transportation.
check box No concern for top clearance because trailer folds lower than the tow vehicle.
check box Requires no special storage when not in use. Fits in standard driveway or back yard.
check box Can reach less accessible camping sites that are too tight for large RV's.
check box Limited space practical only for very short trips.
check box Living area is closed up during transportation and is inaccessible even during rest stops.
check box Non-existent or limited insulation makes this type uncomfortable in cold weather.

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